Temporary Exhibits

faces of mexico

Faces of Mexico: Human Imagery in
Pre-Columbian Art

February 4 - May 6, 2017​

The human figure has been the subject of artisans all the way back to the earliest cultures.  The human form, whether shaped from clay, stone or wood, has been used to represent everything from warriors to deities to mothers and their newborn babies. Although in many casesarchaeologists may never really know what these figures actually represent, the diversity of artistic styles of the figures themselves can be used to discern details about everything from the everyday life of the elites to tantalizing hints about the ritual and ceremony of the shamans and priests.

The modern nation of Mexico is a combination of many cultures. The imagery presented in this exhibition represents some of these cultures at different times in the Pre-Columbian period; from the Classic Maya of the Southern Lowlands of Chiapas to the Casa Grandes Culture of Northern deserts of Chihuahua, from the ancient Olmec culture to the Totonac region of Veracruz. The diversity in imagery is a mirror of the rich cultural diversity that has developed over millennia, creating the rich and varied society that exists today in modern Mexico.

faces of mexico

The El Paso Museum of Archaeology invites you to join us in a journey of exploration as we visit the Pre-Columbian past of our southern neighbor and peer into the Faces of Mexico. Admission to the Museum and to this exhibition is free of charge. For more information please contact George Maloof, Curator at (915) 755-4332 or MaloofGO@elpasotexas.gov​